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Driving, Living and Doing Business in Bad Weather

Photo, "A Snowy Day in Michigan" Courtesy of Bryan Johnson, 2011

Yesterday afternoon, I was quietly thinking about how I would spend the rest of my day.  Having the house, and time, to myself after non-stop holiday activity was just too good to not enjoy. I decided to take a nap and just allow myself to wake up when my body told me to. Only problem is, there was this one fly that didn't get the memo. He danced on the ceiling and buzzed between my blinds and the light globe relentlessly. When I got to the height of my irritation, I had a spiritual "bop" upside my head: having to deal with a fly in late December in Michigan is a miracle. The same miracle that allowed me to take a walk on dry land wearing just a sweater, not have to clean off my car, and turn down my heat.

Today, Michigan is looking like Christmas again. I woke up to snowy roads and wet tires on pavement making dirty noises outside my window. As a Michigander, grim forecasts for drivers this time of year is the norm. Oddly enough, however, I heard a lot more firetrucks, screeching tires on the unseasonably warm days we had this weekend. Just like my adventure with the house fly the other day, I think we can take things for granted when things are going smoothly. When driving, living, or doing business, we can afford to do this. Here's a few tips for driving in bad weather that can be applied to life and business:

1. Be prepared for inclement weather at all times, with the flexibility to relax and connect with your surroundings.  Similary, in life and in business we have to reconnect with our vision to gain a sense of direction.

2. Use your rearview mirrors! Look back at what has worked and what hasn't worked for you in the past and see what might be coming back into view or creeping back into your life. Change can save a business, but keeping your best practices in constant view can keep it.

3. Clean the snow and debris off your car so that you can see clearly. Hurt, fear, too much or too little confidence can distract from your view of what lies ahead.

4. Keep Your Eyes on the Road! In other words, Stay Focused!

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