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Don't Forget to Give a 'Shout Out'

Les Go Social Tip of the Week, shared with Aquarius Press and Willow Books newsletter.

The advertisement above is a sneak preview of the tips you will find when you join my newsletter to be relaunched in 2014.  Nobody is immune to the ills in society that can surface on social media, but there are many more benefits than risks. One way, is to give the places, vendors, stores, artists, nonprofits, and restaurants a shout out. If you don't know what a shout out is, I will explain. Back in my hey day (mid 90s and early 2000s), there was time each evening that my favorite Detroit radio DJ would allow people to call in and request a song and mention a name of a family member, friend, or business. It would sound something like this, "Hi, my name is George and I would like to request Butterflies by Michael Jackson. I also wanna give a shout out to my One Touch Barber Shop and Salon on 7 Mile." It was a simple gesture, but I remember making decisions on places to eat or frequent when going to Detroit based on those "shout outs."
For a lot of people, the holidays mean more traveling and eating out at a variety of venues. Visitors and community members can make this a truly social experience by snapping a quick pick of a part of their meal or decor that stands out and Yelp! them, Instagram a photo of the product or service with a rating or check in with the photo on a favorite social media site (s).

Why? You might ask. 
  1. It helps many local restaurants out that don't have huge marketing dollars. 
  2. It helps build credibility and familiarity for your favorite vendors, two factors that influence buying behaviors.
  3. It allows your customers or readers to see you in action, being a member of the community.
  4. You can share that picture on their social media fan page, increasing business for them and visibility for you. 
As an entrepreneur, writer, or small business owner - you never know where your simple gesture may influence positive energy and/or generate leads in your direction.


Please note: George and One Touch Barber Shop are fictional names to illustrate the point:)

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